What on Earth is the GYROKINESIS® Method?

Trust me, I initially asked a very similar question - GYRO-ki-huh?!?!

As described on the GYROTONIC website:

The Gyrokinesis Method is a movement method that addresses the entire body, opening energy pathways, stimulating the nervous system, increasing range of motion and creating functional strength through rhythmic, flowing movement sequences. It is an original and unique method, which coordinates movement, breath and mental focus.

As described by my teacher, Ann Fonte:

Borne out of teaching yoga for dancers in the 1970’s, Juliu Horvath developed the Gyrokinesis Method because yoga wasn’t addressing all of the things he wanted to in his own body and for his students. It’s about opening up and connecting with the spine, awakening the body and all the senses. “More often than not, my students leave feeling taller.”

As understood in my own body:

I’ve always felt that we can each find something to complement or balance out our yoga practice – some people are drawn to Pilates, some folks run, some lift weights – to each their own. The fluid motions and space created by the Gyrokinesis practice really makes sense in my body. In my mind Yoga and Gyrokinesis are very much related, and occasionally I throw some Gyrokinesis exercises into my yoga classes when they feel appropriate. It has helped me to look at actions in my body differently, and helped me to connect to the way I move and breathe in my practice as well as my day-to-day.

The first time I took a class a number of years ago, it didn’t make sense/feel awesome in that first practice, so I didn’t go back for a time. Then, in 2017, I took the class again and it just CLICKED! All of a sudden I couldn’t get enough of this new work I could do through my body. Besides different styles/focuses of yoga, this is the first new physical practice that I’ve studied in the 12+ years I’ve been teaching – I love it, highly recommend trying it, and love to talk about it if you have questions.

 

So, should I try taking a Gyrokinesis Class?

Why not?!? I think that the movement can feel a bit strange/not quite in-sync initially, so I’d recommend taking a few classes before you decide whether you’re fussed about it or not. And if all you get out of it is a few hours of attention to breath and body, there’s nothing sad about that!

Who is a Gyrokinesis Class good/beneficial for?

Better question: Who ISN’T a Gyrokinesis Class beneficial for?!?!? One of the things I love about this practice is how accessible it is! And accessible does not mean “easy” – some of it is done seated on a stool, some standing, some floor work, but all of those pieces of the class can be modified if you need to. The movements don’t have to be huge, or super fast. Breath work is always beneficial (in my opinion), so you’ll feel good after that work as well. It’s worth giving it a shot!

Where can I take a Gyrokinesis Class in Boston?

Currently, I teach only at the Equinox Sports Club on Avery Street in downtown Boston. These classes are included in the Equinox Membership, so unfortunately we don’t do day passes/drop-ins. However, I’ve been to several other studios in the greater Boston area that I’d recommend you check out:

And if I add any classes to my schedule that are accessible to the public, I’ll definitely add them here!